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Our Programs

We help people who have experienced brain injuries, strokes, and many neurologic disorders, using our unique approach to restore the brain and body to harmony. The rehabilitation programs listed on this page are the most common for the patients we see, but this is not a comprehensive list as we see other conditions as well. If you do not see your condition listed, please reach out to us because we may still be able to help you.

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We see patients traveling from out of state, as well as local patients who live in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

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  • Memory issues

  • Fatigue

  • Irritability

  • Anxiety

  • Depression

  • Emotional issues

  • Dizziness

  • Double vision

  • Blurry vision

  • Headaches

  • Inability to focus

  • Poor sleep

  • Loss of appetite

  • Light sensitivity

  • Sound sensitivity

  • Brain fog

  • Nausea

  • Balance issues

Concussion

Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS)

A concussion is a common type of brain injury caused by an impact to the head or a whiplash-type event such as a car accident. Brain function is impaired as a result, and symptoms can last weeks, months, or sometimes years past the event. Some concussions cause a loss of consciousness, but most do not.

During a concussion event, the brain bounces or shifts  inside the skull. Brain tissue is put under a high amount of stress, which leads to damaged brain cells (neurons) and shifts in neurochemistry.

 

A significant percentage of concussion patients do not heal properly, due to other comorbidities or underlying hidden conditions that were triggered by the concussion. These people suffer from a particularly challenging or extended recovery period, which is known as Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS). 

Symptoms

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disruption in the normal function of the brain and can be caused by physical trauma, blast waves, or a violent jolt to the head or neck. TBI can range in severity as mild, moderate, or severe, and symptoms will vary based on which brain regions have been affected by the injury.

Every TBI is different, as there are a multitude of different factors that contribute to the effects experienced. Some of these include severity level of the TBI itself, area(s) of the cerebral cortex affected, and the person's health prior to the injury. 

 

Rigorous research over the last half century has instilled much hope in the TBI arena, leading to the invention of novel therapeutics that help regain lost function after a brain injury.

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Symptoms
  • Cognitive issues

  • Problems with gait

  • Memory issues

  • Fatigue

  • Irritability

  • Anxiety

  • Depression

  • Emotional issues

  • Dizziness

  • Double vision

  • Blurry vision

  • Loss of motor function

  • Headaches

  • Speech issues

  • Confusion

  • Seizures

  • Inability to focus

  • Poor sleep

  • Loss of appetite

  • Light sensitivity

  • Sound sensitivity

  • Brain fog

  • Nausea

  • Balance issues

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Symptoms

The brain controls many different body functions, so the location of the stroke will determine which effects are experienced.

  • Speech impairments (aphasia)

  • Memory issues

  • Foot drop

  • Loss of sensation

  • Loss of motor function

  • Emotional issues

  • Dizziness

  • Vision problems

  • Confusion

  • Paralysis

  • Muscle weakness

  • Inability to focus

  • Poor sleep

  • Nausea

  • Balance issues

  • Gait imbalances

  • Impaired spatial awareness

Stroke

A stroke occurs when an artery in the brain either becomes blocked or ruptures. 

What are the types of stroke?

Ischemic Stroke

Most strokes (87%) are ischemic strokes. An ischemic stroke happens when blood flow to part of the brain is cut off, leading to cell death. This is usually the result of a blood clot in an artery preventing oxygen-rich blood from reaching the brain.

Hemorrhagic Stroke

A hemorrhagic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain leaks blood or ruptures, flooding the area with blood. This blood puts excess pressure on brain tissue, and leads to cell death within minutes.

Venous strokes are possible, but to a lesser degree.

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

A TIA is a mini-stroke, caused by a temporary clot. 

Dysautonomia

Dysautonomia refers to a group of medical conditions caused by problems with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). This part of your nervous system controls involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, digestion, regulation of body temperature, bladder function, sexual function, hormonal function, just to name a few. Dysautonomia can often accompany acquired brain injury or neurodegenerative disease, as well as result from detrimental lifestyle habits such as alcoholism and/or drug use.

Some common conditions that fall under the umbrella of dysautonomia include postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), familial dysautonomia (FD), and autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG).

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Symptoms
  • Heart rate irregularities

  • Balance issues

  • Migraines

  • Dizziness

  • Visual disturbances

  • Abnormal sweating

  • Nausea

  • Headaches

  • Breathlessness

  • Depression

  • Anxiety

  • Erectile Dysfunction

  • Digestive issues

  • Fatigue/weakness

  • Low blood sugar

  • Sleep issues

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Balance Disorders

Dizziness, Vertigo, BPPV, etc.

Balance disorders are conditions that make people feel like they are moving when they are standing still, a feeling of being unsteady, off-balance, dizzy, lightheaded, or a host of other perceived symptoms. There are many different types of balance disorders, including head trauma, medications, problems in the inner ear, and visual processing issues.

Cognitive Decline

Cognitive decline can be as mild as a cognitive impairment, or as severe as dementia. It begins with mild confusion and memory loss that may be associated with aging. While some cognitive decline can be expected as the brain ages, more and more people are experiencing abnormal levels of cognitive decline at younger ages. This can progress to Alzheimer's Disease, dementia, and other neurodegenerative disorders, which can be life altering. 

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Chronic Pain

About 1 in 5 Americans suffer daily from chronic pain, with a wide range of causes including inflammation, autoimmune conditions, and nerve dysfunction. ​Nerves are susceptible to dysfunction in a number of different ways, and pain signals can often continue months to years after an actual injury. Chronic pain, however, does not need to be caused by a particular event, and can instead result from years of poor posture or underlying disease such as fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis.

Headaches & Migraines

Millions of Americans suffer from frequent headaches and migraines every year, with quality of life significantly decreasing as a result. There are different types of headaches including cluster headaches, sinus headaches, tension headaches, and migraines, with migraines often being accompanied by nausea. While headaches can have many different causes including poor sleep habits, high stress levels, and vascular issues, there are successful treatments that do not involve prescription drugs.

Image by Hermes Rivera
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Movement Disorders

Hypokinetic | Hyperkinetic

Movement disorders often involve the basal ganglia and can be categorized into two main groups: hypokinetic (slow movement) and hyperkinetic (fast movement). Some movement disorders, however, present with combinations of hypokinetic and hyperkinetic symptoms. If identified early, novel therapies may help slow progression.

Hypokinetic

Parkinson's Disease, freezing, instability, rigidity 

Hyperkinetic

Tremors, chorea, dystonia, myoclonus, tics 

Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal Neuralgia is a condition involving the trigeminal nerve that causes sharp, excruciating pain on one side of the face. Initially, this may present as short, mild attacks, if left untreated, it can become a chronic pain condition. While relatively rare, trigeminal neuralgia can be debilitating and is more commonly diagnosed in women over age 50. Causes of trigeminal neuralgia can result from trauma, viruses, pressure, or neurodegenerative diseases.

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Performance Optimization

Mental, Physical, & Emotional

While we see many patients with damaged nervous systems from brain injuries and strokes, we also work with healthy individuals who wish to maximize their potential. Whether you are looking for sharper mental focus or improved energy levels for athletic performance, our services can level-up your physiology and give your neurology a tune-up.

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